sau·da·de (souˈdädə/):

a feeling of longing, melancholy, or nostalgia for something that does not exist.
jarule11:

The Roots

jarule11:

The Roots


Jung Lee, Once In A Lifetime, 2011


Jung Lee, Once In A Lifetime, 2011

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I want to tell you how much I love you.

(via seahells)

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Nicki Minaj is not a woman who easily slides into the roles assigned to women in her industry or elsewhere. She’s not polished, she’s not concerned with her reputation, and she’s certainly not fighting for equality among mainstream second-wave feminists. She’s something else, and she’s something equally worth giving credence to: a boundary-breaker, a nasty bitch, a self-proclaimed queen, a self-determined and self-made artist. She’s one of the boys, and she does it with the intent to subvert what it means. She sings about sexy women, about fucking around with different men. She raps about racing ahead in the game, imagines up her own strings of accolades, and rolls with a rap family notorious for dirty rhymes, foul mouths, and disregard for authority and hegemony.

While Beyoncé has expanded feminist discourse by reveling in her role as a mother and wife while also fighting for women’s rights, Minaj has been showing her teeth in her climb to the top of a male-dominated genre. Both, in the process, have expanded our society’s idea of what an empowered women looks like — but Minaj’s feminist credentials still frequently come under fire. To me, it seems like a clear-cut case of respectability politics and mainstreaming of the feminist movement: while feminist writers raved over Beyoncé’s latest album and the undertones of sexuality and empowerment that came with it, many have questioned Minaj’s decisions over the years to subvert beauty norms using her own body, graphically talk dirty in her work, and occasionally declare herself dominant in discourse about other women. (All of these areas of concern, however, didn’t seem to come into play when Queen Bey did the same.)



On some real stuff though! Yes women in Delhi are saying what NEEDS to be said!

On some real stuff though! Yes women in Delhi are saying what NEEDS to be said!

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shadesofamethyst:

lickystickypickyshe:

The Turkish company Pugedon has recently introduced a vending machine that’s an innovative way to help both the environment and our furry friends. It releases food for the city’s stray dogs and cats every time a plastic bottle is deposited, and it allows people to empty their water bottles for the animals as well.

This wonderful service operates at no charge to the city because the recycled plastic pays for the cost of food. So, with a little financial investment, the simple machines do a lot of good. They provide a steady source of sustenance to the animals, many of which rely on caring residents to regularly feed them. It also encourages people to make a habit of recycling and help conserve our environment for future generations.

Put these everywhere

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kite117:

And I would have gotten away with it too if it weren’t for you meddling kids and your talking dog

kite117:

And I would have gotten away with it too if it weren’t for you meddling kids and your talking dog

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natural-thin:

Perfecf rainy day song

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Pizza